Monday, 8 April 2013

Thoughts on Baroness Thatcher

With the news of Baroness Thatcher's passing, some local figures would like to contribute their thoughts. Please add you own in the comments section!


Councillor Stephen Fenwick said:
Cllr Stephen FenwickAny death of a political leader is very sad, especially a former Prime Minister. Whilst I do not agree with many of Baroness Thatcher's Policies, it is a sad day for British politics.  I will not be partaking in messages of condolence  as I have detested Baroness Thatcher's policies and am not a fan of hers or the Conservatives.  However, as a politician, I bode her well.









Simon Densley said:
Simon Densley
I am sad to hear about the death of Baroness Thatcher. What ever you thought of her politics, she was a great leader and an inspiration. She demonstrated that the glass ceiling didn't exist for her and showed that if you are determined enough and work hard enough you can succeed no mater what your background circumstances.

She took Britain at the end of the 1970's as the sick man of Europe, buckling under the weight of entrenched socialist ideas and transformed us into a country where people felt free and able to forge their own success. In less than a decade she made us a nation to be proud of again. Like any leader she made mistakes but without her, I dread to think what state Britain would be in today. Rest in Peace, my thoughts are with you and your family today.


(Update 9th April) Councillor Stuart Gordon Bullock said:
Cllr Stuart Gordon BullockMargaret Thatcher's death diminishes us because she has shaped the world that we have today. She rescued us from trades union anarchy in 1979, created by James Callaghan's government with unburied corpses and uncollected refuse, with her  reforms of trades' union law and gave elected Government back the power to govern. The tributes that are being paid by our national and international leaders are richly deserved and she blazed a torch for women in this country by being the first woman Prime Minister showing that anybody with the necessary talent and determination can get to the top of any career they choose. As the Prime Minister has noted, she was a great Prime Minister, a great leader, and a great Briton.

30 COMMENTS (Add Yours Now!):

Lance Concannon said...

Were the spelling errors in Stephen's comments his own, or introduced by the author? This is really important to me...

Worcester Park Blogger said...

There were a few more spelling errors that were cleaned up, however the ones left are Cllr Fenwick's own. I have since received a revised version of his quote which I have now update (having fixed 5 spelling mistakes).

andrew bessant said...

what a cruel thing to say, she has done things you can only dream of!!!! Politician yeah right

Onion Eric said...

Stephen Fenwick should have stopped writing after the second sentence. I grew up in WP and always voted for the Lib Dems. I never thought a voted councillor could come out with such irrelevant and disrespectful bile. Yes, she made some really bad decisions (Miners, poll tax etc) but she also made some good ones (right to buy council houses etc). But when she made a decision she really didn't see it through. Hows Clegg getting on with the students?

Onion Eric said...

Was it really necessary for Stephen Fenwick to continue writing after the second sentence? Thatcher wasn't perfect but what politician is (Clegg with the students spring to mind, Lib Dem isn't he? Chris Huhne lying scum-bag Lib Dem wasn't he?) As a voted councillor Mr Fenwick should remember that some of his constituency may be ex-service personnel and a good many of them hold a level of respect for her and her decisions. Shame there isn't any more like her in politics now as most politicians (mainly Lib Dems) don't have the balls nor the guts she ever had.

Jason J Hunter said...

In the words of the Great Paddy Ashdown, whom I have the utmost regard for...

"I opposed almost everything she did (but found myself following many of them when I tried to get the Bosnian economy going by lowering taxes and freeing up the market). Though there will be many who saw her as the author of much destruction that we still mourn, much that she pulled down needed to be pulled down.

She was better as destroyer of old tired institutions and lazy ways of thinking than she was as the builder of new ones; better at defining divisions than building cohesion. But probably that’s what Britain needed then. Had we on the left not grown so lazy about our addictions to the easy ways of state corporatism, she would perhaps have been less successful at so cruelly exposing their hollowness. The pre-eminent attribute in politics is courage; the moral courage to hold to the things you believe in. And this, like her or loathe her, she had in abundance. Personally charming to all except those in her cabinet; fearless when taking on her enemies, even to the extent of making up some of her own; utterly implacable in her patriotism, albeit of a kind that didn’t always serve the country’s long-term interests. She won great victories for what she stood for at home and huge respect for our country abroad. If politics is the ability to have views, hold to them and drive them through to success, she was undoubtedly the greatest prime minister of our age, and maybe even the greatest politician."

axlrocky said...

councillor Fenwick - confirming what i've always thought about Lib Dems, im glad your irrelavance of a party will be destroyed at the next election - what a twonk (as polite as I could get!)

Balkankicks said...

Jason when were you in Bosnia any why, very interested as I am balkan child!? Funny place huh?

DT said...

Thanks for posting that orbituary by Paddy Pantsdown, it's probably the most balanced one I've read. But I'll now forever think of the Iron Lady as a wrecking Crew, clearing the political construction site for John Major and Tony Blair to reconstruct on.

patricia hayden said...

She destroyed communities, families and in some cases lives. My mother, who lived alone, haa heart attack. Her Doctor tried to get her into hospital but because of the "cut backs" and she was over 70 he tried but could 'nt get her a bed. She really needed treatment but it was not available to her. She passed away shortly afterwards. Thank you Maggie. Now we tax payers have to pay 8 billion for her funeral. Its a joke.

Selena Belle Harvey said...

Stephens comments just go to show how hoplessly out of touch the Lib Dems are locally..Shame on you!

Stewart Nonsuch Mackay said...

Cllr Fenwick ...No condolences for the baronesses family. Not very sporting old chap..

DT said...

I come from a generation that was brought up not to speak ill of the dead. However, it seems that even in death Margaret Thatcher has changed Britain's society. The number of people setting up parties to celerbrate and making derogatory comments has surprised me.

I would guess Cllr Fenwick comes from a younger generation that has no such taboo and perhaps in future we will see dysologies for more people, or maybe she will continue to be a one off.

Steve said...

Whilst I could never support the Lib Dems after getting into bed with the Tories, I agree wholeheartedly with Stephen. That woman created the culture of greed above all else that lead to the banking collapse. Whatever tosh the Mail wishes to print, and however much the current government likes to blame the previous, we reap today what she sowed in the 80s.

Alex said...

Those who are aware of the recent resignation of 17 year-old Paris Brown will be especially aware that age is a bogus explanation for the poorly chosen words in Cllr. Fenwick's last sentence (even after revisions).


Some younger readers will probably feel insulted by your unconvincing justification, but certainly nobody will be in any doubt of your political allegiance.

A said...

If Britain still relied on the coal industry and various other manufacturing industries Britain would be well on its way to crumbling apart.

Coal oil and gas in the UK are and always have been unsustainable in the long run as these resources are fast running out and are fast falling out of favour, and how can we compete on labour intensive manufacturing when it can currently be done at a fraction of the price overseas.

She started the move to service and financial industries which saved Britain and put it back on the map. Obviously there have been issues but on the whole Britain is so much better off. Particularly if you look at the disparity between 1970s and 1990s.

Simon Densley (Consv Activist) said...

Jeff, you obviously have a strong hatred for Margaret Thatcher but it is worth pointing out some inaccuracies here.


If you have been listening to some of the debates on things like the BBC's Question Time you will know that several points of 'history' are not disputed. For instance many more coal mines were closed under the previous Labour Government than by Margaret Thatcher's Government. She inherited a country controlled by the unions that was in terminal decline and already deeply divided. She did actually promote one other woman to the cabinet rank - Baroness Young. She made other women ministers as well, like Edwina Currie but yes she didn't go out of here way to fill the ministerial ranks with women. However it has been said that as she herself had fought her way to the top on merit alone her attitude was that any other woman could do the same. To show any favouritism to women would be effectively telling them they could not do it by themselves.


I would like to know what you mean when you say she sent out the wrong message to Argentina - are you saying she deliberately caused them to attack the Falklands?

DT said...

Maybe her government sent the wrong message, with the MOD removing the ice patrol and the FO in talks over the future of the islands. But I don't think you can blame her directly for the actions of those departments, they have always had direct control over such minor matters. It's only with hindsight can it be seen to have been one of the (minor) causes of the invasion, a more important one was Galtieri's government trying to hide its failings with a patrotic war.


You can blame her for removing two million blue collar jobs and thus creating the benefit culture, but it was I'm sure an unforeseen consequence of her aim of trying to change the UK economy from being broadly manufacturing based to almost wholly dependent on financial services.


And taking the party so far to the right that Tony Blair could step in and take the 'One Nation Tory' just right of centre ground, that Ted Heath's government owned, before her putsch. This of course led to the wilderness years.

Jeff said...

There you go rewriting history, I was an adult during the period she ruled, it wasn't Labour who closed down the coal mining industry, it was Thatcher and your Tory party. Britain wasn't in terminal decline before Thatcher, we had almost full employment and most working people earned good money. The trade unions weren't the monsters you make out, they alone helped people to achieve a high standard of living, it wasn't granted by kind-hearted Tories and their friends in the City. If we still had a coal industry we could be making petrol and oil out of it to replace North Sea oil. And she should have known one platoon of British soldiers and an armed trawler wouldn't deter the Argentinians. It's hard to think of one good thing she did and interesting. to note contemporary Tories think she's a role model. I wouldn't have wished her dead but I do regret that when I passed her in the street in Chelsea a year or so ago I didn't shout abuse at her. As for all these women you say she brought into her Cabinet, whenever you see a photo of her and her cabinet they're all men - or did she have the women retouched out.

Jeff said...

Everything can be done at a fraction of the price overdeas, it's called exploiting cheap Third World labour. Of course coal oil is viable if the will to do it is there and stop listening to the misinformation put about by Shell oil and BP and other global multinationals. As for the UK becoming the financial services capital of the world, do we really want those gangster bankers in our country selling their toxic loans and making obscene amounts of bonuses - and when the whole rotten system collapses expecting ordinary citizens to bear the cost through massive cut backs and even more unemployment.

Stewart Nonsuch Mackay said...

Shouting abuse at an an 86 year old woman in the street. Sir, you disgust me.

Jeff said...

There is no statute of limitations for shouting abuse at someone who has caused untold misery for millions of people. Even living to 100 wouldn't make you too old and I'm closer to Thatcher's age than you are.

Stewart Nonsuch Mackay said...

Statute of limitations aside .. What about common courtesy and respect for you elders ...Sir you and left wind friends are a disgrace.

Jeff said...

A true story about Mrs Thatcher during the Falklands War. Having decided to go to war with the Argies she called for John Nott, her Minister for Defence. "Look John, I want to do this properly" she told him. "We need to sign a declaration of war, you know, to cover the safe exit of diplomats and commercial considerations. You've probably got the wording somewhere, bring it and I'll sign it."
Nott went back to his Ministry and ordered the civil servants to find the required document. But 24 hours later they told him no such document could be found.
Thatcher was furious when told, she couldn't believe it. "Well can't you find a previous declaration of war and base it on that!" was her curt reply. Nott conferred with his advisors: "When was the last ti me we signed a declaration of war - and where is it?" he demanded with with growing unease. "That would have been World War Two with Germany" someone suggested. "Well find it fast, where would it be, Margaret doesn't like to be kept waiting" answered Nott with the first signs of panic. "Er, that would be at the National Archives at Kew" came the answer.
Nott jumped in his car and headed for the National Archives where he was met by the Curator and his senior archivists. He explained the problem. "Well you're right it should be here" answered the Curator. "But the funny thing is I've never come across it - and I would have expected to, something as famous as that". Nott's sphyncter muscles began to tighten. "Well bloody well find it and fast". None of the assembled archivists had seen it either though one helpfully suggested it would be in the FO371 series. "how many documents in that series" asked Nott. "just under half a million" came the answer.
Well, all leave was stopped at the National Archives and every available body spent the next 48 hours searching but to no avail. Finally Nott had to report the failure of his mission to Mrs T who glared at him and said "Well we'll ave to go to war without one, thank you John". Nott left the room shamefaced at which point a contemptuous Mrs T made the classic remark to those still present: "WHAT ARE WE TO THINK OF A MINISTER OF WAR WHO CAN'T EVEN PRODUCE A DECLARATION OF WAR!"
Years later someone found the WW2 declaration - misfiled under 'North West Europe - miscelaneous'.
Well I must go now, we're cracking open the Champagne.

parkerilla said...

What has this got to do with Worcester Park?

DT said...

That story doesn't ring true, surely someone in cabinet would have know that WW2 was not the last war, you have Aden (63-67), Suez (56) and Korea (1950-) all of which would have required a Declaration of war. Also, someone would have thought of ringing up the German Chancellor to get the original, after all the American Declaration of Independence is at Kew, only copies are held in America.

Jeff said...

There were no formal declarations of war for Suez, Aden and Korea, the latter being a UN operation and Aden was considered a terrorist operation. Maybe they asked the Germans but it could have disappeared in the carpet bombing of Berlin. That's the story as it happened, sorry if it doesn't ring true to you DT, I worked at the National Archives for many years but maybe with your superior knowledge on everything you're right and we all imagined it.

DT said...

Don't be so touchy, I didn't say it wasn't true, I just said it didn't ring true. If you were working there at the time, I bow to your superior knowledge, it must have been a fairly new setup at the time, so it's not too surprising things got lost.

Touchy Jeff said...

Sorry. There should be no demonstrations at Margaret Thatcher's funeral in keeping with the old tradition of allowing the enemy to bury their dead in peace with whatever ceremony they wish. But I fear we live in less civilised times.

DT said...

I understand the Romans had a tradition of turning their backs to the funeral procession of unpopular people, perhaps those that wish to demonstrate could make that peaceful gesture.


And of course write to their MP at the waste of Public money in these times of Osbourne Restraint.

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